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Severe thunderstorm watch issued for Palm Beach County, Treasure Coast

Cloudy skies mute the sunrise Monday at Midtown Beach in Palm Beach.
Cloudy skies mute the sunrise Monday at Midtown Beach in Palm Beach

Find those umbrellas, South Florida. It’s going to be a wet day.

The National Weather Service has issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast until noon today, because of the expected downpour.

This means that 1-inch hail, 70-mph wind gusts and dangerous lightning are all possible.

Both Central and northern South Florida- including Okeechobee, Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach and Broward counties – are affected.

In Palm Beach County, today kicks off with a 50 percent chance of thunderstorms and showers, with a partly-sunny high of 86 degrees, according to NWS. Come nightfall, the 50-percent chance for rain will continue, with an expected low of 70 degrees.

Don’t expect to put away your umbrellas on Tuesday either.

The 50 percent chance of rain and thunderstorms will continue, with a high of 85 and a low 69 degrees.

Meanwhile, in the Treasure Coast, forecasters expect a high of 85 and a low of 63 degrees, accompanied by a 70 percent chance of showers.

Of course, the 50 percent chance for rain will continue on Tuesday, with a high of 83 and a low of 64 degrees.

Despite the much-needed and expected rain, it won’t be enough to make a dent in the region’s drought or dim the threat of more wildfires, meteorologists said.

Rainfall at Palm Beach International Airport is down 15 inches since Oct. 1, around the start of the dry season, and approaching two feet below normal since June 1, around the start of the 2010 wet season, the National Weather Service’s Miami office said.

In a posting late Thursday, it said March has been mostly bone dry, except for a “very weak” cold front that moved through March 17 with rainfall totals of less than a tenth of an inch.

An “extreme drought” designation for Palm Beach and Broward counties has expanded to northern Miami-Dade and areas west of Lake Okeechobee, according to the posting

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